Golden Eagle Additively Innovative Lecture Series at Tennessee Tech University

Tennessee Tech University (TTU), over the last 5 semesters, has planned and delivered the “TED Talks of Additive Manufacturing,” says Dr. Ismail Fidan, Professor of the Department of Manufacturing and Engineering Technology. The series, known as the “Golden Eagle Additively Innovative Lecture Series” is delivered via Zoom, a web video conferencing platform.

NOTE: If you or your students are looking for the most current 3D technology and the opportunity it presents, sign up for the web-based lectures on 3D printing here. Full text details on the webinars are at the end of this post.

The lecture series has trained 500-plus people from all over the world, from Africa to Europe to North America, on a wide variety of timely, hot Additive Manufacturing (AM) topics. These talks are aimed at AM industry professionals as well as STEM educators. If you have been looking for on-point, deeper talks about Additive Manufacturing, keep tabs on what Dr. Fidan and his team are doing at Tennessee Tech University.

The lectures are offered through the iMakerSpace, which was established as a university-wide, student-centered space under the leadership of the Colleges of Engineering and Business. It serves as a focal point on campus to provide training, service, partnership, research and evaluation in Innovation and Entrepreneurship to all disciplines. It also encourages interdisciplinary teams and provides support and training to extend Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E) activities into research and the classroom.

AM WATCH is an ATE funded project focused on the skills AM technicians need to know.  The AM Studios provide STEM educators with the education/training/exposure to 3D that they can integrate into their current programs.

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Golden Eagle Additively Innovative Lecture Series SPRING 2018

  • February 22: Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing: enabling 10-meter metal parts with Filomeno Martina, Ph.D., WAAMMat Program Manager Welding Engineering and Laser Processing Center, Cranfield University, UK
  • March 1: Free and Easy Software for Designing for 3–D Printing with Timothy Gornet, Manager of the Operations Rapid Prototyping Center, University of Louisville, Kentucky
  • March 29: AM Research and Applications for Real World Production and Impact with Eric N. Wooldridge, PE, RA, Professor of Additive Manufacturing, Workforce Development, and Pre-Engineering at Somerset Community College, Kentucky
  • April 19: Dental 3–D Printing Overview with Frank Alifui-Segbaya, Program Director for Bachelor of Dental Technology School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Australia

Winners from 2017 Stratasys Extreme Redesign, 3D Printing & Product Design Competition

Last week, AM News profiled the 2018 Stratasys/GrabCAD 3D Printing Extreme Redesign Challenge. We highlighted the details of the 3D printing challenge so students (and educators) could consider entering the contest. But in this post, we want to highlight the seven winners from 2017 to acknowledge their success and look at what they created as inspiration for this year.

Image provided by Stratasys / GrabCAD

Take a look at what the 2017 Extreme Redesign winners created (photos and general information from the challenge website used with permission from Stratasys):

1st Place: Biomimetic Robotic Prosthetic Hand

Grayson Galisky from Los Alamitos High School (CA)

Since he began 3D printing four years ago, 18 year old Grayson Galisky has been perfecting his craft by completing many different projects, and even building his own 3D printers… By modeling his design with major human hand components, he created more life-like features with regard to movement and speed. Galisky made innovations in the control department as well by using draw-wire sensors to collect data from his own hand movements to send to the robotic hand. Read more about the Biomimetic Robotic Prosthetic hand project here.

2nd Place: Bidirectional Ratchet

Connor Meehan from Saline High School (MI)

A problem solver at heart, Connor Meehan is an engineer who uses 3D printing to solve problems people in his life are facing. In particular, an arthritis problem his grandfather, who loves working on cars, is facing fueled the inspiration behind his bidirectional ratchet… Meehan wanted to invent a way for his grandpa to continue the automotive work he enjoyed without suffering from the stress on his joints. Thus, the bidirectional ratchet was created. Read more about the Bidirectional Ratchet here.

1st Place: Adjustable, Reusable and Modular (ARM) Cast

Thomas Salverson from University of Alabama in Huntsville (AL)

Although Thomas Salverson has no plans to be a doctor, he managed to create a new way to care for broken arms with his adjustable, reusable and modular (ARM) Cast. After being exposed to 3D printing through his high school rocketry team, Salverson started seeking out other ways he could exercise his 3D printing skills. The ARM casts consists of a modular ring, adjustable pads and an elbow joint, all which can be detached and then put together on the arm. Check out this innovative new Adjustable, Reusable and Modular (ARM) Cast here.

2nd Place: Fender Lock

Matthew Wong & Luis Carvalheiro from Ryerson University (Ontario, Canada)

A friend’s stolen bike seat and one 3D printing competition later, Matthew Wong and Luis Carvalheiro created a full-proof way to make sure bike seats never leave the bike they’re attached to again. After learning of the Extreme Redesign Challenge from their teacher, they soon started thinking of problems they could solve and remembered the story of their friend’s stolen bike seat. So they created the Fender Lock — more than just a lock, it includes a retractable fender to prevent your back from getting dirty and a convenient bottle opener as well. Read more about the 3D printed Fender Lock here.

1st Place: Intricate Flower Centerpiece

Daniel Fahy from University of Oxford/St.Catherine’s College (Oxfordshire, UK)

Daniel Fahy is fascinated by the unique, crazy designs you can make with 3D printing and as an engineer, he’s someone who likes to do it himself. Fahy was interested in the Extreme Redesign Challenge because of design freedom, and the limitless capabilities of 3D printing, which shows in his intricate flower piece. With his design, Fahy’s goal was to make a functional piece of art to show the endless possibilities 3D printing has to offer. His design uses zinnia and dahlia flowers for inspiration, which symbolize remembrance, represented by the candle function, and a lasting bond between two people, represented by the jewelry box. Read more about the Intricate Flower Centerpiece functional art project.

2nd Place: Khachkar – Armenian Cross Stone

Sergey Kuznetsov from J-Design Pro (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation)

Sergey Kuznetsov is a creator. As a sound engineer and video jockey for more than 20 years, Kuznetsov started looking for other avenues to exercise his creativity. In his search for something new, he found 3D printing and admired the way that people were able to express themselves through the models they make. After dedicating himself to learning it and enrolling in design school, he 3D printed a khachkar, an Armenian outdoor stele. Kuznetsov’s inspiration to make a khachkar came because of its symbolism and beauty. Read more about the Khachkar Armenian Cross Stone project.

NCATC School Winner: Universal Tablet Holder for Phantom Drone 3

Jacob Haynes from Danville Community College (VA)

Jacob Haynes does his best to 3D print every day. Since discovering 3D printing at his technical high school, he’s constantly using the 3D printer at Danville Community College to make new things. One of those things was a universal tablet holder for Phantom Drone 3. It improves upon traditional drone holders with a bigger surface for cameras, since most only have a platform that is big enough for a phone. This design was originally made for a class project, but Haynes’ teacher liked his design so much he suggested Haynes’ enter it into the Extreme Redesign Challenge. Read more about the Universal Tablet Holder for Phantom Drone 3 project.

 

TEAMM Network Member Profile: Nano-Link at Dakota County Technical College

Some facts are too big to comprehend: A trillion dollars of US debt. While some are tiny and just as difficult: A sheet of paper is 100,000 nanometers thick. Human hair is 80,000 nanometers wide. And a strand of human DNA is a mere 2.5 nanometers in diameter. Nano-Link, supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation, focuses on these tiniest of atoms and molecules, but it has a big vision.

Forecasts of nanotechnology workforce needs cite 500,000 nanotechnology technicians needed by 2020. As an Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Regional Center, Nano-Link, is tasked with growing both an industry and an education network to help meet these workforce needs, according to the website.

Watch Deb Newberry, former Principal Investigator for the Nano-Link project, explain the vision for nanotechnology for today’s students.

Nanotechnology covers subjects from physics and chemistry to emerging technologies such as photonics and biotechnology. It looks at market segments that go beyond the traditional electronics and materials industries, to encompass segments as diversified as lubricants, paper manufacturing, cellulose, energy, consumer products and the food industry.

Nano-Link began in 2008 at Dakota County Technical College creating a NanoScience 2-year Degree. With 10 years under their belt, the program continues to provide nanoscience course content to colleges: The Nano-Infusion Program (NIP) provides hands-on training, specialized modules that they offer at your location, at no cost to you. These products and services are for use in the (7 – 14) classroom or boardroom.

According to the website, the Nano-Link goals include:

  • Create a nationwide alliance of institutions that are the pipeline for the nanotechnology workforce.
  • Develop alliance faculty capacity to interface with industry, correlate industry-needed skills with program or course competencies and outcomes, and develop continuing relationships responsive to the changing technology environment.
  • Prepare students for the nanoscience and emerging technologies workforce.
  • Create a consortium of secondary educators that are masters in nanoscience education to engage students, including URMs.
  • Industry organizations and representatives are an integral part of the Nano-Link National Center.

Nano-Link has successfully advanced nanotechnology across nine colleges and two high schools. As they train the trainers, the program continues to grow and expand, proving that even the tiniest of molecules can make a difference.

Additional Resources: If you are looking for Core Competencies (performance indicators), the National Resource Center for Materials Technology Education offers a range of them. It specifically has a downloadable PDF for Nanotechnology Core Competencies.

According to the MatEdU website on Core competencies: “[they] provide a set of performance indicators that technicians, scientists, engineers, educators and technologists need to know in today’s advanced manufacturing environment to be able to accomplish in their work.”

Additive Manufacturing – Workforce Advancement Training Coalition and Hub (AM-WATCH)

In August, AM News reported on TEAMM Network member, Dr. Ismail Fidan from Tennessee Technological University, who created a new “train the trainer” 3D printing workshop called the Additive Manufacturing Studio aimed at STEM educators. The Studio is a nationwide program that has grown out of a larger project: The Additive Manufacturing Workforce Advancement Training Coalition and Hub (AM-WATCH).

AM-WATCH is being established to address gaps in the knowledge base of 21st century technicians to ensure they are prepared for advanced career placement. Since most of our readers will agree that Additive Manufacturing (AM) is changing the way we design and produce a wide range of products (and that term does not cover the diversity of objects being produced), there is and will be a growing demand for technicians in the industry.

According to the website and grant, “The objective of AM-WATCH is to address gaps in the current knowledge base of technicians through the development of curriculum and educational materials, delivery of professional development activities, support provided to 30+ community college and high school instructors per year, and expanded outreach activities targeting K-12 and community college teachers and students. Tennessee Technological University is collaborating with Community Colleges (CC), four-year universities, the ATE National Resource Center for Materials Technology Education, a national laboratory, industry, and government in the development of cutting-edge and multi-dimensional curriculum, activities, and toolkits for instructors.”

The Additive Manufacturing Studio for STEM educators mentioned above is part of this AM-WATCH project.

Keep up with what Tennessee Technological University is doing with their Additive Manufacturing program here: TTU AM-WATCH website.

Smartphones Can Record 3D Printer Sounds and Replicate The 3D Model

Nearly every machine has a distinct sound signature and that includes 3D printers with their multiple stepper motors. Thieves who are able to get physically close to a fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer as it prints would be able to record the sounds as the model prints and then, by using sophisticated algorithms, reverse engineer that model and print it.

UPDATE 30JAN2018: Cyber acoustic analysis of additively manufactured objects was published in the The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology. Authors: Thomas Mativo, Colleen Fritz, and Ismail Fidan.

Dr. Ismail Fidan, Professor of the Department of Manufacturing and Engineering Technology and College of Engineering-Faculty Fellow in Innovation and Techno-Entrepreneurship at Tennessee Technological University and his team conducted a cybersecurity research project that was able to record 3D printer sounds as an object was printed and later replicate that model on another printer by performing a cyber acoustic analysis. A classification and regression model was completed on the audio recorded during the 3D printing process and G-Code data was created to attempt another 3D print.

Image Courtesy of Tennessee Tech University – Dr. Ismail Fidan

To date, according to the research paper and results, “Current security measures have focused on securing machines against cyber based attacks with cloud based resources and software programs. Nevertheless, attacks in the physical domain have also occurred… The physical component of AM machines opens up the system to vulnerabilities due to side-channels. Side-channels are indirect pathways that lead to the access of desired data such as obtaining G-Code from vibrational, acoustic, magnetic, or power emissions. Previous analysis of side-channels has been used to infer information about cyber domain data. Therefore, it is important to analyze these side-channels to better secure the system and prevent leakage of IP.”

Image Courtesy of Tennessee Tech University – Dr. Ismail Fidan

As other researchers have pointed out, these intellectual property risks are not far-fetched and present a real problem for additive manufacturing. Dr. Fidan and team are proving that it is possible to record and reproduce a 3D print. Built into that research, IP protection methods are sure to evolve. Keep track of Dr. Fidan’s work at Tennessee Technological University and its Additive Manufacturing (aka 3D Printing) efforts.

Illustration Courtesy of Tennessee Tech

Additional Resources:

The University of California, Irvine reported on a similar research project in 2016: Bad vibrations: UCI researchers find security breach in 3-D printing process.

“The team, led by Mohammad Al Faruque, director of UCI’s Advanced Integrated Cyber-Physical Systems Lab, showed that a device as ordinary and ubiquitous as a smartphone can be placed next to a machine and capture acoustic signals that carry information about the precise movements of the printer’s nozzle. The recording can then be used to reverse engineer the object being printed and re-create it elsewhere. Detailed processes may be deciphered through this new kind of cyberattack, presenting significant security risks.”

A team at the University of Buffalo published Smartphone hacks 3-D printer by measuring ‘leaked’ energy and acoustic waves.

“Unlike most security hacks, the researchers did not simulate a cyberattack. Many 3-D printers have features, such as encryption and watermarks, designed to foil such incursions. Instead, the researchers programmed a common smartphone’s built-in sensors to measure electromagnetic energy and acoustic waves that emanate from 3-D printers. These sensors can infer the location of the print nozzle as it moves to create the three-dimensional object being printed.”